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I printed out your advice. My further adventures in Economics (read: PhD program) won't begin until the Fall 2010 semester.

An interesting approach to this advice might be to list pitfalls, traps that young economists often fall into. Does Thomson do something like that?

Dr Boettke, from your description this book is mainly aimed at PhD students, is there another book along the same lines that might be worthwhile for an undergraduate economic science student to read?

Let's look not backward, but ahead. Younger people need to start thinking about this ...

http://www.physorg.com/news166943362.html

All academics is politics, and the politics is going to change ...

Greg,
A bit too radical, don't you think? Wikipedia for example, failed in becoming better source of information than a good old encyclopedia.

"remember, while teaching is local, research is global"

This is a gem. Well said.

When is the 2nd edition coming out?

"Wikipedia for example, failed in becoming better source of information than a good old encyclopedia."

What an odd statement on a blog devoted to subjectivist economics. Not to mention that by any objective measure it's extremely popular - eg, Alexa rates it as the seventh most visited website in the world.

GilesStratton,

I don't know of any really good guide to undergraduate study. But I would say the first thing is to be intellectually curious and study widely in the social sciences and the humanities. The second thing I would say is to pick professors not classes. Listen to your classmates and others and do some background research on what your professors are up to writing and lecturing on. Third study economics chronologically --- start with Adam Smith then read Ricardo and J B Say and JS Mill then Menger, Bohm-Bawerk, and then Wicksell and Wicksteed, and then Mises and Hayek. I think if you give yourself two years of intense study of these classics in economics, along with taking classes in philosophy, politics, history, and standard economics. You will have the background to excel in graduate school and build a career as a researcher in economics.

Good luck in your studies. It is a very exciting adventure becoming an economist.

Pete

"Third study economics *chronologically --- start with* Adam Smith then read Ricardo and J B Say and JS Mill then Menger, Bohm-Bawerk, and then Wicksell and Wicksteed, and then Mises and Hayek."

Thanks, Dr. Boettke. I've wondered about that.

Boettke posted:
"Don't be a stranger. Work with classmates, attend seminars, take advantage of the opportunities to meet with visitors, and above all else make sure the professors know you, your interests and the quality of your work. Hiding out in the library studying (or in your apartment), while necessary at times, should not be your main daily routine."

This is valid for undergraduate students too?(I guess it is.) I try to be more communicative but it is difficult in my university because most teachers only like the ones that are very good at math. Except the marxist ones. Here in Brazil study the classics and the austrians like you recommended is not usefull in the short run (for the undergraduate stundent to get to a decent graduate program), but surely, it is the basis for the long run research career.

There is one self identified austrian economist in Brazil, his name is Fabio Barbieri, have you ever heard about him? He got his PHD in 2005, in a local university (his thesis was about the calculation debate and its relationship with market process theory, the standard austrian material). He said that he had great difficulties to get a job because his study focused on austrian economics wasn't usefull in any pecuniary way. Today he teaches undergraduates.

Rafael,

I never heard of the particular researcher you mention, but I would be interested in reading his work and meeting him.

Did you ever hear of Gilberto Salgado. He earned his PhD from NYU in the 1990s, he helped me with the 3 volume reference work on Hayek, and he contributed a paper to a book that was published not that long ago on sustainability and economic growth.

http://www.sdnetwork.net/pdfs/pegurier_salgado_chapter5.pdf

I have lost track of Gilberto, but in terms of sheer knowledge of Austrian economics he has it so you might want to seek him out. He was a very serious student of Prof. Kirzner's.

Of course, you could also go to Argentina and study at ESADE with individuals such at Martin Krause, or UFM. I actually chaired a dissertation at UFM, so I know students can do their PhD's there.

Pete

"if you give yourself two years of intense study of these classics in economics, along with taking classes in philosophy, politics, history, and standard economics. You will have the background to excel in graduate school and build a career as a researcher in economics."

I am afraid if you don't throw a fair amount of math in there as well you won't have the background to get accepted to a good graduate school.

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To your blog, I learned a lot! This also is very good!

i like this part of this blog:" Don't sit on papers. In other words, don't have 10 working papers, let alone 20. Get them out the door to journals. But only if they are ready. Revise until ready, but then submit. And remember that thick skin when reading referee reports." is very good

In clear, concise language—a model for what he advocates—William Thomson shows how to make written and oral presentations both inviting and efficient. Thomson covers the basics of clear exposition, including such nuts-and-bolts topics as titling papers, writing abstracts, presenting research results, and holding an audience's attention.

Good economic theory mixes rigorous mathematical reasoning with intuitive motivations and stories, which can make the task of presenting or evaluating cutting-edge research a treacherous balancing act. In this one-of-a-kind essay, Thomson offers an armful of good advice and tricks of the trade to economists young and old, lest any of them forget that a bad container can spoil its contents.

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