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No way! This is fantastic news! What class is he going to be teaching?

Wow, this is huge. Great news for all the grad students.

"the day Pete Leeson agreed to join the faculty at GMU."

Alright Dr. Boettke, we get it.

Hooray!

This is outstanding news!

Great news. Congratulations to GMU and to Larry White.

Wonderful! This is big news. Congratulations are indeed due to Larry and GMU alike.

What a lineup! Congratulations! Please try to convince Professor White to start blogging on this site - there isn't much action over at his current blogging home!

Wow this is amazing news for GMU students!

As a prospective student in GWU's Austrian Econ Phd program, I find this is very exciting indeed. I can't wait to get started in this program next year.

Amazing ! GMU is really going to a new step.

Incredible! Simply incredible!

As someone who is a marginal prospective student (in the sense of not sure whether to continue graduate education or where to do so), this definitely makes me more interested in GMU.

Now a question.

Prof.Klein has written - in EconWatch Journal if I am not wrong - about the impact of GMU on internet. A vibrant presence on the WEb (ok) with several blogs (overcoming bias, this one, Profs Kling and Caplan, marginal revolution etc)...but here is the paradox: the homepage of the GMU Econ department is not always updated. working papers'section, for example, is not a good mirror of the scientific production of GMU. Several links don't work (try to find the econ of religion's Iannacconne links, some of them don't work), etc.

Do we have a paradox here?

Now a question.

Prof.Klein has written - in EconWatch Journal if I am not wrong - about the impact of GMU on internet. A vibrant presence on the WEb (ok) with several blogs (overcoming bias, this one, Profs Kling and Caplan, marginal revolution etc)...but here is the paradox: the homepage of the GMU Econ department is not always updated. working papers'section, for example, is not a good mirror of the scientific production of GMU. Several links don't work (try to find the econ of religion's Iannacconne links, some of them don't work), etc.

Do we have a paradox here?

Claudio,

Different management of the sites so the incentives are different. Go to individual websites, e.g., Roger Congleton's, and you will see a very easy to navigate website.

Also, it depends on what different scholars want to emphasize in their work. Some push their books, some push their essays, and others push their research in journals. But we don't really have any "dead-wood" at GMU, I'd say 95% or higher of the faculty are actively engaged in research that gets published every year, year after year.

So my suggestion, do not go to department web site, in fact, the working paper series in the department is probably a decade old. Go instead to individual websites and perhaps the Mercatus website (though that captures more policy relevant research).

And by the way there is always EconLit and SSRN, etc. That would give you a good list of current activity.

Just in the past few years, several faculty have published in AER, JPE, EJ, JLE, JLS, etc. and books with Princeton, Cambridge, etc. We have also had students publish in the AER and even in Nature.

This is why I get bothered sometimes by all the talk about our blogging because many assume it means that people are no longer publishing research in the journals. Different faculty members have different focus, but the department still holds its faculty to the conventional standards of journal publishing. We do have a broader conception of research activity than say NYU had (has), but at the end of the day we are judged by the same standard of publishing in the top journals in the field. Take a look at the CV of Thomas Stratmann, or Dan Houser.

So I would argue that the reason GMU does so well on the Klein's score (and others) of web presence is because we have a broader conception of our role as TEACHERS of economics. We teach not just our students in the classroom, but also are actively engaged with the public and seek public forums. But our teaching is a complement, not a substitute, for our research on economic and political economy questions. GMU at its best moments is the best weird place in the world for economic research and graduate education. At its worst, the place reverts to the mean and we become like any other program near the Potomac. There is a constant battle in university and department life to fight "mean reversion". But when you "dare to be different" and you strive for excellence on the relevant margins, you can fight that.

In recent years we made an effort to establish a first-rate program in economic history with the hiring of John Nye and others. We also attempted to build in the economics of religion. We are obviously strong in public choice and law and economics. And we also are one of the better places to study the history of economic thought.

The hiring of Larry solves many issues and fights against mean reversion --- we build in money/macro, we build in Austrian, and we build in both economic history and history of thought.

We also just recently hired two new experimentalists to work at ICES with Dan Houser, and we are still in the market for another chair or two in political economy.

GMU -- best weird place in the world to study economics.

Maybe Larry can help Pete refine his taste in music. By refine I mean improve.

Congratulations, Larry! And congratulations, GMU!

Thanks, Prof. Boettke, for the detailed answer. I had been doing exactly this: checking individual webpages. But I would like to see a more efficient webpage for the department.

Amazing team with prof. White! Congratulations!

Fantastic news!

That's a great announcement, Pete. If you don't mind, I'd like to quibble:

"The first two far exceeded even my wildest expectations, and I have little doubt that the same will be said about this third moment."

Are you saying you currently forecast that your current forecast is too low? Is that allowed?

@Bob Murphy

I think he's saying that his expectations are cranked all the way to 10, but that the moment may go to 11.

Welcome, Larry!

I am sorry I did not see this before. This is fantastic news!! Happy for Larry and for GMU.

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