December 2017

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31            
Blog powered by Typepad

« A Closer Look at the Rising Unemployment Rate | Main | Does One Need to Know Economics to Do Political Philosophy? »

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

third. nice.

Congrats. Very impressive. Keep on climbing.

I find this funny in wake of recent sneering comments about the GMU Econ Dept. at Thoma's site.

see:

http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2008/06/libertarians-an.html#c117896634

and

http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2008/06/this-global-sho.html#c117932316

I'm glad that we're doing good in the ranking. But, these ranks almost never tell you much about the quality of the school. I think most students can learn more from a school where there are some decent publications with focused teachers than one where research is so intense as to leave no time for students.

The methodology to identify the quality of teaching would be pretty difficult to find. Perhaps looking at the publications of graduating students upon the first 5 years of graduation. Information like that would tell those interested in programs a lot more than the current ranking.

I don't care if a professor has 5 Nobel Prizes and the most publications in the world if he doesn't care in class and avoids students at all possible interactions.

GMU gets my #1 ranking.

Eleventh in Law and Economics is VERY impressive. But let's not pay a lot of attention to these numbers because if books are excluded then something really important is missing in the ratings.

I'm extraordinarily interested in pursuing a PhD in econ at GM (a year from now). However, I will only have completed Cal I and Cal II, and possibly Linear Alg.

This doesn't meet the min requirements for PhD candidates. Otherwise I think I'm an extraordinary candidate (State and International Awards, GPA, scholarships, and listened to 99% of EconTalk, as well as reading tons of econ).

I'm very open to suggestions or advice. I've written to Russ and Don, but they only respond to my non-school questions. =(

Dear Grunyen,

Focus on getting a solid GRE math score -- 770 or higher. If you do, then most likely the DGS will not be strict on the pre-requisites given that you have had Calc 1 and 2.

However, keep in mind that the best way to clear all of this up is to take classes over the next year in the math department at your university rather than taking additional econ electives (provided you have completed the requirements for the major.

Good luck.

Thanks Pete. (You can't know how exciting it is to hear from you and Russ and Don. Some people would wig out over Paris Hilton, I'm a weirdo)

Unfortunately Cal II and Linear Alg. will be all I can do by graduation time. I don't think I can stand waiting another year just so I can do more math- putting off applying.

If you have the chance to email me, I would definately appreciate some further Q&A. I assume you can access my email address through the blog. Thanks again!

Grunyen,

I'm just finishing my first year at Mason and I had the EXACT same background in math as you did. Needless to say, I had a lot of difficulty in math econ.

No offense to professor Boettke but I feel his advice is way off. You can take a Cal. III and IV course and end up using only 3 or 4 concepts from a year of math.

Mathematical Economics is extremely scattered. It uses a little linear algebra, a little of this a little of that. Taking whole courses will be largely a waste of time. The book that help edeveryone in the class with poor math skills is:

Schaum's Outline Introduction to Mathematical Economics.

Also get Alpha Chiang's Mathematical Econ book. This is basically a standard.

The best method to prepare is to get the syllabus beforehand and take the course yourself. Ultimately, don't take Math Classes. Take Math Econ classes if possible. It will save you hours of your life.

Grunyen,

Vedran gives good advice on what books to read:

Schaum's Outline Introduction to Mathematical Economics.

Also get Alpha Chiang's Mathematical Econ book. This is basically a standard.

Read both of those and you will do fine. You need to score well on the GRE Math, for that you will need to study a Princeton Review, etc.

BTW, see my post from a few days ago about gearing up for GMU.

Pete

I found Calc III, linear algebra and the usual math courses quite useful and interesting. Stopping at Calc II doesn't make a lot of sense imho as its not until Calc III/Analytical geometry that you really tie it all together into something useful. If you can, chose math professors who tend to be more theoretical and proof oriented rather than computational. Dr. Goldin at GMU is amazing.

If you are currently doing your undergraduate studies right now, I would recommend you think about working for a year and taking a few math courses at the same time. A year of working as an economist would be greatly beneficial and the math courses would be useful and improve your competitiveness. You could probably learn enough to get by without taking the courses, but it will depend somewhat on how mathematically inclined you are and whether you want to get by or be the best.

For the record I did my undergraduate work at GMU, then worked as an economist for 3 years and am now doing graduate work at another school.


My former employer is hiring at the moment, if you are interested shoot me a message on facebook.

best if luck!

Great site.

Hello guys...I'm glad that we're doing good in the ranking. But, these ranks almost never tell you much about the quality of the school. I think most students can learn more from a school where there are some decent publications with focused teachers than one where research is so intense as to leave no time for students.

nice focus , search this from blogsearch and good luck for you.just add the rss feed toward my reader,keep bring up to date!

I am glad to have this news.

Your ideas are really specific, I assist you. I imagine you should be described as a clever man. So I would like to know you.

Many thanks to the person who made this post, this was very informative for me. Please continue this awesome

work. Sincerely...

Sounds very promising. I would definitely keep this in mind. Kudos for sharing!

I can’t say enough good things about this shoe, whether you are traveling or reside in a warmer climate, check them out. They are the air jordan shoe equivalent to the little black dress.Check out this link to see the number one place to buy http://www.shoestmz.com

Great article. I particularly like the giant facemask, and I'm surprised that Belichek hasn't tried it already.

I get much more here, thanks

The comments to this entry are closed.

Our Books